News Archive

  • College of Sciences Researchers Win Grant to Advance Robotic Prostheses

    Georgia Tech team will collaborate with University of Alabama engineers

    The goal is to make robotic prostheses easier to use by patients.

    The National Science Foundation awarded Young-Hui Chang and Senior Lecturer Lee Childers a grant to figure out how to make the use of wearable lower-limb robotic prostheses much easier for patients and thereby reduce the burden on the healthcare system.

  • Running Roaches, Flapping Moths Create a New Physics of Organisms

    Researchers are interested in the strategies creatures have developed to overcome the challenges of moving though their environments.

    Sand-swimming lizards, slithering robotic snakes, dusk-flying moths and running roaches all have one thing in common: They're increasingly being studied by physicists interested in understanding the shared strategies these creatures have developed to overcome the challenges of moving though their environments.

  • BioInnovation Showcase

    Inaugural event at Petit Institute puts innovative, homegrown businesses in the spotlight

    Inaugural event at Petit Institute puts innovative, homegrown businesses in the spotlight

    Inaugural event at Petit Institute puts innovative, homegrown businesses in the spotlight

  • Welcoming New Colleagues, Celebrating Award Recipients

    College of Sciences greets 2017-18 academic year with annual summer dinner

    One program director, one professor of practice, eight assistant professors, two associate professors, and three professors joined the college in the 2017-18 academic year.

    The College of Sciences feted new colleagues joining in the 2017-18 academic year at a summer dinner on Sept. 6. Dean and Sutherland Chair Paul M. Goldbart and Jenny Singleton, associate chair and professor in the School of Psychology, hosted the celebration, which also recognized recipients of 2017 College of Sciences awards.

  • As 'Flesh-Eating' Leishmania Come Closer, a Vaccine Against Them Does, Too

    A potentially deadly parasite that can ulcerate skin, nose, mouth and organs could someday meet its match in an experimental vaccine that has now worked in lab tests on humanized mice.

    Boils the size of sand dollars, acid-like facial wounds, death by maiming of liver and spleen. Leishmania parasites inflict suffering around the world that is the stuff of parables, and they're the second-deadliest parasites after malaria. Global warming is slowly pushing them north toward the United States. Can a new experimental vaccine someday stop them? The vaccine has worked in humanized mice, as detailed in a new study.

  • Molecular Evolution Core Open for Business

    Georgia Tech core facility emphasizing skill and technique may be only one of its kind in the world

    Georgia Tech core facility emphasizing skill and technique may be only one of its kind in the world

    Georgia Tech core facility emphasizing skill and technique may be only one of its kind in the world

  • Was the Primordial Soup a Hearty Pre-Protein Stew?

    Proteins are tough to make outside a living cell, so how did their components evolve on pre-life Earth? Perhaps easier than thought.

    How proteins evolved billions of years ago, when Earth was devoid of life, has stumped many a scientist. A little do-si-do between amino acids and their chemical lookalikes may have done the trick. Evolutionary chemists tried it, and got results by the boatload.

  • School of Mathematics Will Crunch the Numbers for Advancing Data Science

    Tech wins NSF funding for new interdisciplinary research institute that will tackle “big data”

    The School of Mathematics will be part of an NSF-funded interdisciplinary effort at Tech to research data science

    Georgia Tech is getting $1.5 million in government funding to help take data science to the next level. The School of Mathematics is one of six Tech schools to collectively establish a new interdisciplinary research institute on data science.

  • School of Psychology Ph.D. Student Among 2017 Foley Scholar Finalists

    A big year for the GVU Center includes the 10th anniversary of the Foley Scholars Program.

    School of Psychology Ph.D. student Dar-Wei Chen is one of eight Foley Scholar Finalists.

    Dar-Wei Chen’s research in educational technology wins him a place among eight finalists for the GVU Center’s 2017 Foley Scholarships, annually awarded to graduate students looking for ways to improve computer technology’s impact on people’s lives. 

  • You and Some 'Cavemen' Get a Genetic Health Check

    Evolution has improved upon the genetic foundations of human health ... but could that have changed?

    Evolution has improved upon the genetic foundations of human health ... but could that have changed?

    Evolution has improved upon the genetic foundations of human health ... but could that have changed?