News Archive

  • A Popular Tool to Trace Earth’s Oxygen History Can Give False Positives

    A system to determine the presence of ancient oxygen by testing rock layers may need to be taken with a grain of salt.

    If someone cries "Eureka!" because it looks like oxygen appeared in Earth's ancient atmosphere long before the body of evidence indicates, consider this: If it was a chromium isotope system reading of ancient rock that caused the enthusiasm, it might need to be curbed.

  • Powerful New Tool for Genome Analysis

    Petit Institute core facility at Georgia Tech adds new equipment and services, allowing researchers to dive deeper

    Petit Institute core facility at Georgia Tech adds new equipment and services, allowing researchers to dive deeper

    Petit Institute core facility at Georgia Tech adds new equipment and services, allowing researchers to dive deeper

  • Science Majors Are Among Inaugural Sustainable Undergraduate Research Fellows

    Cohort will design Kendeda Living Building's dashboard

    Ten Georgia Tech undergraduates were selected as the inaugural (2017-2018) class of Sustainable Undergraduate Research Fellows (SURF).

    Ten Georgia Tech undergraduates were selected as the inaugural (2017-2018) class of Sustainable Undergraduate Research Fellows (SURF). Among them are Faizah Asif, from the School of Biological Sciences, and Gigi Pavur, from the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences.

  • Two from College of Sciences Are Finalists in 2017 Three Minute Thesis Competition

    Kelly Michie and Linda Nhon join 11 others in explaining their research in three minutes

    Come see the final round of the 2017 Three Minute Thesis Competition on Monday, Nov. 13, in the Student Center Ballroom.

    Figuring out how to help 6.5 million Americans who suffer from chronic wounds each year is a problem Kelly Michie has researched for years. Recently she’s faced another challenge — squeezing all of that research into a three-minute presentation for the 2017 Georgia Tech Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition.   

  • Google Plugs In Georgia Tech Chemistry Team’s Software for its Quantum Computing Product

    Search giant’s new software could help future powerful computers unlock chemistry’s secrets

    A team of Georgia Tech chemistry researchers will have its software included in Google's new quantum computing software product.

    Someday, quantum computing will let researchers do faster, cheaper data processing. When that day comes, chemistry could turn out to be quantum computing's killer app. Georgia Tech researchers have written a popular suite of software programs for quantum chemistry work, and Google has announced it will use that suite in its new free, open-source quantum computing software product.

  • Neuroscience and Neurotechnology at Tech

    Across Georgia Tech, researchers, scientists, and students are creating the next breakthroughs in understanding this complex system, treatments of neurological diseases and injuries, and tools to improve neural function.

  • AMP-IT-UP Teachers Participate in Gulf of Mexico Research Expedition

    Teachers Assist with ECOGIG Research Relevant to AMP-IT-UP Ocean Ecology Classroom Modules

    Two Griffin-Spalding County teachers visited the Gulf with ECOGIG to assist with research and collect water samples.

    AMP-IT-UP teachers Cheryl Wilder and Kathy Duke from Griffin-Spalding County schools participated in an ECOGIG research cruise to the Gulf of Mexico. The cruise provided the teachers with real-world experiences that they will apply in the classroom, where they have been teaching their seventh graders three AMP-IT-UP modules on ocean ecology.

  • Astrobiology Rising at Georgia Tech

    What will a coalescing community of Tech researchers discover about life in the cosmos?

    The growing visibility of researchers interested in astrobiology is helping Georgia Tech emerge as a powerhouse in the field.

    In the Ford Environmental Science and Technology Building, the office of Martha Grover is three doors from that of Jennifer Glass. Both are Georgia Tech scientists doing research related to astrobiology – life in the cosmos – but until last year they hardly talked to each other as researchers with common interests. Now, Grover, Glass, and others at Tech are members of a growing community that’s coalescing astrobiology activities across campus.

     

  • Toward Personalized Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis

    Georgia Tech’s Sam Brown Receives CDC Grant to Develop Treatment Strategies

    The grant will advance efforts to personalize the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    Sam Brown aims to understand the dynamics of the bacterial populations – or microbiomes – associated with cystic fibrosis to develop treatments targeting the specific microbiomes of individual patients.

  • Rousing Masses to Fight Cancer with Open Source Machine Learning

    Sharing is caring in the fight against cancer with this new open source software project to predict cancer drug effectiveness.

    Here's an invitation for a throng of researchers to gather and fight cancer in an open source software project to hone predictions of drug effectiveness. Georgia Tech researchers have kicked off the project with a program they tested to be about 85% effective in making predictions in individual patient treatments. It's free for the downloading and usage to anyone touching the fields of medicine and related computation. The researchers think their software is pretty good already but that the participation of others could make it soar. And that could save a lot of lives.