College of Sciences Researchers in the News

  • Mystery solved: How flamingos can sleep while standing on one leg

    There was a eureka moment for School of Biological Sciences professor Young-Hui Chang during his research into why and how flamingos can stand and sleep on one leg. That revelation helped Chang and fellow researcher Lena Ting, a professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, describe in their new study how the flamingo's skeletal and muscle systems allow them to hold the one-legged pose with little muscle effort. Chang is also the director of the Comparative Neuromechanics Laboratory.

    The Washington Post, May 24, 2017

  • Flamingo balancing act saves energy

    Flamingos can "stand proud while having a doze," says this BBC News story. How they do that may involve some unique flamingo biomechanics, according to a new study on the elegant birds from School of Biological Sciences professor Young-Hui Chang and Wallace H. Coulter Dept. of Biomedical Engineering professor Lena Ting. Their work also suggests a possible reason why these birds engage in this habit. Chang is also the director of the Comparative Neuromechanics Laboratory

    BBC News, May 24, 2017

  • Neuromechanics of flamingos’ amazing feats of balance

    A new Georgia Tech study on why and how flamingos can stand on one leg for hours on end is already getting a lot of A-list science media attention. In this post for The Conversation website - "academic rigor, journalistic flair" - the study's co-authors, School of Biological Sciences professor Young-Hui Chang and Walter H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering professor Lena Ting, explain why they wanted to study this question, and how "gravity plus anatomy" combine to make the flamingo a marvel of biomechanics. 

    The Conversation, May 23, 2017

  • Why Flamingos Are More Stable on One Leg Than Two

    Here's how award-winning science writer and author Ed Yong of The Atlantic decribes the new research from Tech's Young-Hui Chang and Lena Ting on how and why flamingos can stand on one leg for long periods of time. The subject matter is a great match for Yong's talents; with a lively writing style, he describes the efforts that Chang and Ting put in to understand this unique flamingo habit. Chang is a professor in the School of Biological Sciences and director of the Comparative Neuromechanics Laboratory. Ting is a professor in the Wallace Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering

    The Atlantic, May 23, 2017

  • Explorations of Oxygen-Free Seas on the Oceanus, Part IV: Methane

    School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Assistant Professor Jennifer Glass blogs from the sea, off the coast of Western Mexico, aboard R/V Oceanus, owned by the National Science Foundation and operated by Oregon State University. In this fourth and final blog post from the sea, Glass's soon-to-be PhD student Abbie Johnson talks about the importance of methane in oxygen-minimum zones of the seas.

    SAGANet, May 21, 2017

  • Explorations of Oxygen-Free Seas on the Oceanus, Part III: Nitrogen

    School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Assistant Professor Jennifer Glass blogs from the sea, off the coast of Western Mexico, aboard R/V Oceanus, owned by the National Science Foundation and operated by Oregon State University. In this third installment, Glass talks about N2 in the seas. 

    SAGANet, May 21, 2017

  • Chemists may be zeroing in on chemical reactions that sparked the first life

    DNA has had plenty of time in the spotlight over the decades, yet many scientists theorize that ribonucleic acid (RNA) was the key to helping kick-start life on Earth. But how did the four nucleotides that make up RNA come into existence if they weren't around during the planet's beginnings? A new study from researchers based in the United Kingdom may be getting closer to answers, and Nicholas Hud, Regents Professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, weighs in on their efforts.

    Science Magazine , May 19, 2017

  • Explorations of Oxygen-Free Seas on the Oceanus, Part II

    School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Assistant Professor Jennifer Glass blogs from the sea, off the coast of Western Mexico, aboard R/V Oceanus, owned by the National Science Foundation and operated by Oregon State University. "Six thousand feet below our ship, three tectonic plates are colliding," begins this blog post. "Like slow-moving conveyor belts, the Rivera and Cocos Plates creep under the North American Plate. Where the denser oceanic plates dip below the less dense continental crust, the Middle America Trench is formed."

    SAGANet, May 17, 2017

  • Why Honeybees Are Good at Grooming (It’s All in the Hair)

    The tenants of the Georgia Tech Urban Honeybee Project are creating quite a buzz about themselves and David Hu's research. Hu, an associate professor in the School of Biological Sciences, recently used bees in the project for a research paper on how the hairs on their tiny little legs factor into pollen gathering and cleanup. The New York Times put the resulting video with the cute title "How Bees Freshen Up" on its home page. The Urban Honeybee Project's director is Jennifer Leavey, a senior academic professional in the School of Biological Sciences. 

    The New York Times, May 15, 2017

  • Explorations of Oxygen-Free Seas on the Oceanus (Part I)

    School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Assistant Professor Jennifer Glass blogs from the sea, off the coast of Western Mexico, aboard R/V Oceanus, owned by the National Science Foundation and operated by Oregon State University. "Ocean waves stretch to the horizon on all sides of us," Glass writes. "Boats passing by would never expect this area of the ocean is different from any other. Yet, hiding beneath the surface is the largest anoxic water body on modern Earth."

    SAGANet, May 12, 2017

  • Did Global Warming Really ‘Pause’ During the 2000s?

    After the El Nino weather event of 1998 resulted in one of the hottest years on record up to that point, what was termed a global warming hiatus or pause then went into effect. For 11 years, temperatures didn't stray far from their usual averages. That slowdown puzzled scientists and added fuel to the political fire over climate change policies. This Atlantic article examines the scientific aspects of the hiatus, and it includes comments from School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Professor Kim Cobb.

    The Atlantic, May 12, 2017

  • Flat Rock Middle inventors appear on cooking show

    They cooked up a winning invention in the recent K-12 InVenture Challenge sponsored by CEISMC, so why not see what they can do in an actual kitchen? That's what the online childrens cooking/talk show Kids-R-Chefs must have thought when they invited the Flat Rock Middle School's 8th-grade team to cook pizzas and talk about their entrepreneurial talents. The Fayette County students won a Specialty Award at the InVenture Challenge for Xtendlet, a cord that extends the reach of normal home power outlets by 25 feet.

    Atlanta Journal-Constitution, May 11, 2017

  • All hail the bee

    This story does indeed sing the praises of the humble honeybee, focusing on special Atlanta projects designed to study and provide homes for our four-winged pollen pals. One of those is the Georgia Tech Urban Honeybee Project, located on the roof of Clough Undergraduate Learning Center. That's where Jennifer Leavey, program director and senior academic professional in the School of Biological Sciences, rules the hives. The story also mentions a recent study from School of Biological Sciences associate professor David Hu, who used the Project to research honeybee hairs and the role they play in pollen collection.

    Atlanta Journal-Constitution, May 11, 2017

  • Why create a model of mammal defecation? Because everyone poops

    Science News is the latest stop for media coverage of David Hu and Patricia Yang's poop paper. This story contains details on how much work the researchers had to do to get information on mammal defecation, including trips to Zoo Atlanta to gather feces, and studying YouTube videos of animals pooping (are you really that surprised such videos exist?) Hu is an associate professor in the School of Biological Sciences, an adjunct associate professor in the School of Physics and an associate professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. Yang is a Ph.D. student in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. 

    Science News , May 11, 2017

  • Meadowcreek High, Georgia Tech celebrate new makerspace area

    Before the makerspace arrived at Meadowcreek High School, the school’s robotics area consisted of a closet in the back of a classroom....The makerspace partnership between Meadowcreek and Georgia Tech’s GoSTEM...aims to enhance the educational experience of Latino students in Georgia. GoSTEM is a program of Georgia Tech’s Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing (CEISMC).

    Gwinnett Daily Post - , May 10, 2017

  • A Word of Appreciation for Teachers

    To celebrate National Teacher Day, on May 9, 2017, Georgia Institute of Technology President G. P. "Bud" Peterson acknowledges those "who have guided and mentored students this past year, sharing with them their time, wisdom, and expertise in order to help them reach their fullest potential." He singles out Georgia 2017 Teacher of the Year Casey Bethel, recipient of the Georgia Intern Fellowship for Teachers (GIFT) administered by the Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing (CEISMC)

    Office of the President, Georgia Institute of Technology, May 9, 2017

  • Could a large scale earthquake hit Central Georgia?

    Up to 10 minor earthquakes rumble across central Georgia every year, according to Andrew Newman, associate professor of geophysics in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. The latest, a 2.4 magnitude quake, hit the area near Sparta in early April. That prompted Macon CBS affiliate WMAZ to ask Newman: Could a much larger earthquake strike central Georgia in the future?

    WMAZ-13 News, May 8, 2017

  • Gender, Psychology, and Justice: Women's Experiences in the Criminal Justice System

    Julie Ancis, adjunct professor in the School of Psychology and associate vice president for Institute Diversity, has co-edited a new book that examines mental health issues for women in the legal system. The book, Gender, Psychology, and Justice: The Mental Health of Women and Girls in the Legal System, examines how gender mixes with race, class, and sexual orientation to impact treatment within the criminal justice system. Ancis and co-editor Corinne Datchi talk about their book with Blog Talk Radio podcast host Heather Stark

    Blog Talk Radio , May 6, 2017

  • Scientists Find Way To Produce Single Layer Of Graphene From Ethylene With High-Temperature Process

    An international team has discovered a way to produce graphene from ethene, also called ethylene, through a high-temperature step-by-step process. The team includes two Georgia Tech researchers who are members of the School of Physics' Center for Computational Materials Science: Bokwon Yoon, a research scientist, and professor Uzi Landman, who is also CCMS director. 

    Science Times, May 6, 2017

  • The Physics of Poop

    Scientific American has reprinted David Hu and Patricia Yang's April 26 article from The Conversation detailing their new research on the defecation habits of mammals. (The Conversation also lists that article as one of its most read items for the past week). In addition to being an associate professor in the School of Biological Sciences, Hu is also an adjunct associate professor in the School of Physics and an associate professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. Yang is a Ph.D. student in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. 

    Scientific American, May 6, 2017

  • Oxygen Level In The Ocean Water Is Facing A Crisis As Temperature Rises Rapidly

    Dissolved oxygen levels in ocean water are a good indication of the health of the world's oceans. But new research from Georgia Tech shows those levels have been declining for the past 20 years. The study, published in Geophysical Research Letters, looked at ocean-related information dating back more than 50 years to find patterns and trends that could be linked to climate change. Researchers found that rising water temperature is a major contributor to the lower oxygen levels, which are dropping at a faster rate than previously predicted. Taka Ito, an associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, led the research team. 

    The Science Times , May 5, 2017

  • High temperature step-by-step process makes graphene from ethene

    Science Daily picked up the Georgia Tech news story about the ethene-to-graphene research study, which included two members of the School of Physics' Center for Computational Materials Science: Bokwon Yoon, a research scientist, and professor Uzi Landman, who is also CCMS director. 

    Science Daily , May 4, 2017

  • 'An Embarrassment': Scientists React to the NYT's Climate Change Column

    Bret Stephens unleashed a Category 6 hurricane on Twitter last week, when he penned a column for the New York Times espousing opinions on climate change that can best be described as...controversial. While acknowledging that human-caused global warming is a settled matter, Stephens argued that the risk climate change poses is not. As a Times push notification sent out to millions of subscribers on Friday summarized, “reasonable people can be skeptical about the dangers of climate change"....Kim Cobb, climate scientist at Georgia Tech University, added that for her, the firestorm Stephens’ column set off highlighted that “as scientists, we need to own more of the conversation about climate change.” Cobb is a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

    Gizmodo, May 2, 2017

  • Meet College of Sciences Spring 2017 Graduates

    Congratulations to our College of Sciences graduates; we can't wait to see what comes next for you!

    cos.gatech.edu, May 1, 2017

  • Healthy Mammals Poop in 19 Seconds or Less

    It's Vice's turn to have fun with a new study on mammal defecation provided by School of Biological Sciences associate professor David L. Hu's lab. The study found that despite a wide range of sizes in bodies and feces, most healthy mammals poop at the same rate. There is one telling behind-the-scenes detail: study co-author Patricia Yang says her team promised other graduate students sharing the lab not to bring their animal dropping samples from the Atlanta Zoo into the lab until after 5 p.m. because of the smell. Hu is also an adjunct associate professor in the School of Physics and an associate professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. Yang is a Ph.D. student in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. 

    Vice, Apr 28, 2017

  • Direct Conversion of Cellulose and Hemicellulose to Fermentable Sugars by a Microbially-Driven Fenton Reaction

    A research team led by Thomas J. DiChristina, a professor in the School of Biological Sciences, has figured out an easier, more environmentally-friendly way to break down lignocellulose (plant-based biomass) waste into bioproducts. The new approach? The use of microbes, instead of specialized enzymes, to power a Fenton reaction, a chemical process often used as a wastewater treatment. Hyun-Dong Shin, a research scientist in the School of Biological Sciences, co-authored the study, which was originally published in Biosource Technology. 

    Renewable Energy Global Innovations, Apr 27, 2017

  • Finding Signs of Alien Life Might Be Harder Than We Thought. Here’s Why

    It seems like every day that astronomers discover another possibly habitable world, like Proxima Centauri b, our closest exoplanent neighbor, and TRAPPIST-1f, one of seven recently discovered Earth-sized planets orbiting the same star. But don't prepare for first contact just yet. It will be exceedingly complicated to figure out whether there's actually any life or potential for it on such planets, based on new research into our own evolving world. Chris Reinhard, an assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, co-authored the study, which was published in Astrobiology.

    NBC News, Apr 27, 2017

  • Student inventions win spot in national competition

    The recent K-12 InVenture Challenge @ Georgia Tech competition on March 15, featuring science-minded students and their inventions from all across Georgia, continues to reap benefits for the winning schools. The Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing (CEISMC) sponsors the annual competition, and two winning teams from J.C. Booth Middle School in Peachtree City, Georgia will go on to vie for honors at the National Invention Convention and Entrepreneurship Expo on June 1-3 in Washington, D.C. A team from Flat Rock Middle School in Fayetteville, Georgia, also took home a specialty award for its Xtendlet extension cord.

    Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Apr 27, 2017

  • Extraterrestrial Life Might Be Hiding in Plain Sight

    To a distant observer peering through a telescope, even Earth would not have shown signs of life through most of its past. Despite the fact that our planet was teeming with mostly microscopic life for three billion years, levels of oxygen and methane – gases often produced by metabolizing organisms – would have been too low to be noticed from afar. This means that today's scientists on Earth might not be able to detect commonly assumed signs of extraterrestrial life, and they might give up on planets that are actually inhabited, according to a new study in the journal Astrobiology. “There are huge swaths of time throughout Earth’s history during which it would’ve been difficult to see the presence of these metabolisms even though we know from the rock record that they were around. It’s a sobering thing,” said Christopher Reinhard, an Earth scientist at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, and lead author of the study. Reinhard is an assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

    Inside Science , Apr 27, 2017

  • Why it takes you and an elephant the same amount of time to poop

    Why was School of Biological Sciences associate professor David Hu drawn towards mammal poop as the topic of a new study? His experience as a working dad, he recently posted on the Conversation blog, "turned me from a poo-analysis novice to a wizened connoisseur." The people running the PBS Newshour website had a chance to digest the post and decided to share it in full on their Rundown blog. Hu is also a adjunct associate professor in the School of Physics and an associate professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. Patricia Yang, a Ph.D. student in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, co-authored the study, which appeared in Soft Matter

    PBS Newshour, Apr 27, 2017

  • All mammals big or small take about 12 seconds to defecate

    Everyone poops, and it takes them about the same amount of time. A new study of the hydrodynamics of defecation finds that all mammals take 12 seconds on average to relieve themselves, no matter how large or small the animal. The research, published in Soft Matter, reveals that the soft matter coming out of the hind ends of elephants, pandas, warthogs and dogs slides out of the rectum on a layer of mucus that keeps toilet time to a minimum. “The smell of body waste attracts predators, which is dangerous for animals. If they stay longer doing their thing, they’re exposing themselves and risking being discovered,” says Patricia Yang, a mechanical engineer at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Yang, a doctoral student in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, worked on the study with David Hu, associate professor in the School of Biological Sciences and an adjunct associate professor in the School of Physics.

    New Scientist, Apr 26, 2017

  • NSF’s uphill road to making prestigious early career award more diverse

    Increasing diversity within academic science has been a priority for France Córdova since she became director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) in 2014. Within a year she had launched an initiative, called INCLUDES, that challenges universities to do a better job of attracting women and minorities into the field. Now, Córdova has turned her attention inward in hopes of improving the dismal track record of NSF’s most prestigious award for young scientists. Only five women have won NSF’s annual Alan T. Waterman Award in its 41-year history, and no woman of color has ever been selected....If only it were that easy, says Kim Cobb, a paleoclimate researcher at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta and one of six university ADVANCE professors with a remit to improve gender equity. Cobb is a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

    Science, Apr 26, 2017

  • Physics of poo: Why it takes you and an elephant the same amount of time

    Somebody give David Hu's graduate and undergraduate students medals for bravery -- and maybe some hazmat suits. Hu, an associate professor in the School of Biological Sciences and an adjunct associate professor in the School of Physics, is a 2015 Ig Nobel Prize winner for his "urination duration" research, and he and his intrepid fluid dynamics team have also gotten hands-on (yuck) with frog saliva. Now he has studied the physics of poop among mammals, venturing to Zoo Atlanta to follow elephants around and figure out things like speed, duration, size, mucosity, etc. Hu, also an associate professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, makes the connection between his research and a better understanding of gastrointestinal health. The research also helped his team design state-of-the-art undergarments for astronauts. Hu's study was published April 25 in the journal (wait for it)....Soft Matter. 

    The Conversation, Apr 26, 2017

  • Thousands, Armed With Puns, March For Science In Atlanta

    The Atlanta March for Science brought more than 4,000 people into the streets around Candler Park on Saturday, April 22. The Atlanta demonstration was one of 600 satellite marches for science around the world. The main event took place in Washington D.C....Joshua Weitz, a professor of biosciences at Georgia Tech, took issue with the new administration's travel ban, which he said has impacted a student of his from Iran. Weitz is a professor in the School of Biological Sciences. 

    WABE 90.1, Apr 24, 2017

  • Climate Modification: Good or Bad?

    It sounds like the stuff of science fiction -- and in fact, a forthcoming movie, "Geostorm," deals with the consequences of humankind trying to control the weather via technology. But a  recent New York Times Magazine article asked whether science could indeed tweak the environment, and perhaps lessen the effects of climate change, by releasing chemicals into the atmosphere. Stephanie Abrams and Jim Cantore, hosts of the Weather Channel's AMHQ morning show, interview Emanuele Di Lorenzo, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, about the science behind possible attempts to tinker with nature. 

    The Weather Channel, Apr 24, 2017

  • Billion-dollar project would synthesize hundreds of thousands of molecules in search of new medicines

    Martin Burke, a chemist at the University of Illinois in Urbana, has watched biologists pull in billions of dollars to decipher the human genome, and physicists persuade governments to fund the gargantuan Large Hadron Collider, which discovered the Higgs boson. Meanwhile chemists, divided among dozens of research areas, often wind up fighting for existing funds. Burke wants to change that. He has proposed that chemists rally around an initiative to synthesize most of the hundreds of thousands of known organic natural products: the diverse small molecules made by microbes, plants, and animals. He has teamed with Jeffrey Skolnick, a computational biologist and professor in the School of Biological Sciences, to come up with a potentially easier way to synthesize natural products. 

    Science , Apr 19, 2017

  • Methane from microbes kept early Earth warm

    Methane-making microbes may have battled “rust-breathing” microbes for dominance in early Earth’s oceans—and kept those oceans from freezing under an ancient, dimmer sun in the process, new research suggests....“The ancestors of modern methane-making and rust-breathing microbes may have long battled for dominance in habitats largely governed by iron chemistry,” says Marcus Bray, a biology doctoral candidate in the laboratory of Jennifer Glass, assistant professor in the Georgia Institute of Technology’s School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. Glass was the principal investigator for the Georgia Tech research team, which included professors Frank Stewart and Tom DiChristina, postdoctoral scholars Jieying Wu and Cecilia Kretz, Ph.D candidate Keaton Belli, and M.S. student Ben Reed.

    Futurity , Apr 19, 2017

  • Why We are Marching for Science

    Marc Weissburg, a professor in the School of Biological Sciences and an organizer of the March for Science Atlanta on April 22, writes in the Ampilfier blog about the need for the scientific community to reach out to the public:

    The Amplifier, Apr 19, 2017

  • Ay, Caramba! 'Bart Simpson' Landslide Reveals Ceres' Icy Innards

    Ceres may look like an ancient, inert mass of dusty rock hanging out in the asteroid belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, but the dwarf planet is proving itself to be to be a dynamic and fascinating place....Now it looks like landslides can be added to the mix. In a new study published in the journal Nature Geoscience, researchers have identified "flow features" on Ceres that look very much like landslides that occur on Earth (including one that looks surprisingly like TV's Bart Simpson) -- all of which are driven by the presence of water ice...."These landslides offer us the opportunity to understand what's happening in the upper few kilometers of Ceres," said Heather Chilton, co-author of the paper and a graduate student in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology. EAS Assistant Professor Britney Schmidt was the lead author on the study, and EAS graduate student Justin Lawrence was a co-author.

    Space.com, Apr 19, 2017

  • Ceres Prank Lands Bart Simpson in Detention for Eternity

    Humankind has a long history of looking up at the stars and seeing figures and faces. In fact, there’s a word for recognizing faces in natural objects: pareidolia. But this must be the first time someone has recognized Bart Simpson’s face on an object in space. Researchers studying landslides on the dwarf planet Ceres noticed a pattern that resembles the cartoon character. The researchers, from the Georgia Institute of Technology, are studying massive landslides that occur on the surface of the icy dwarf. Their findings are reinforcing the idea that Ceres has significant quantities of frozen water. School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Assistant Professor Britney Schmidt was the lead author on the study; EAS graduate students Heather Chilton and Justin Lawrence were co-authors. 

    Universe Today , Apr 18, 2017

  • Saturn moon Titan's "electric sand" would make super castles

    Electrified sands on Saturn's largest moon, Titan, may stick together due to static cling, potentially meaning that sand castles there would last for weeks, a new study finds...."At first glance, if you look at images from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, Titan looks very Earth-like, with dunes, lakes, oceans, mountains and potentially volcanoes, and it has a dense, nitrogen-rich atmosphere like Earth’s,” said study lead author Joshua Méndez, a granular dynamicist at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. “But once you start looking at the details, you realize that it is an alien and exciting world.” Mendez collaborated on the study with Professor Josef Dufek and graduate student George McDonald, all with the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

    CBS News, Apr 17, 2017

  • Saturn Moon Titan's 'Electric Sand' Would Make Super Castles

    Electrified sands on Saturn's largest moon, Titan, may stick together due to static cling, potentially meaning that sand castles there would last for weeks, a new study finds....Joshua Méndez, a granular dynamicist and graduate student at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, speculated that the moon's sand might readily become electrically charged, making its behavior significantly different from that of Earth sand. Mendez collaborated on the study with Professor Josef Dufek and graduate student George McDonald, all with the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

    Space.com, Apr 17, 2017

  • 2017 Georgia Tech Faculty & Staff Awards

    Ten members of the College of Sciences take home 11 awards

    Two administrative and eight academic members of staff of the College of Sciences have been selected to receive 11 awards for the 2016-17 academic year. They are being recognized for innovation and excellence in administration, education, and scholarship.

    cos.gatech.edu, Apr 17, 2017

  • Power and Control in Family Courts

    Divorcing an abusive spouse can be devastating enough for women. But many times the violence and intimidation can spill over into the courtroom during legal proceedings, creating potential new levels of damage to families. Blog Talk Radio host Heather Stark recently interviewed School of Psychology adjunct professor Julie Ancis about her research into this issue during the 3 Women 3 Ways podcast. Ancis is also associate vice president for Institute Diversity.

    Blog Talk Radio , Apr 10, 2017

  • Honeybees are really hairy, so they can carry as much pollen as possible

    Honeybees have almost three million hairs on their tiny bodies. Each hair is strategically placed to carry pollen and also to brush it off. Researchers at Georgia Tech used high-speed footage of tethered bees covered in pollen to see how these hairs work. David Hu, an assistant professor in the School of Biological Sciences, was a co-author of the study. The Georgia Tech Urban Honey Bee Project assisted in the research. 

    Quartz, Apr 10, 2017

  • NASA Taps Georgia Tech Researchers To Build Next Generation Of Space Suits

    NASA announced last month it will recruit a team of Georgia Tech researchers for a new project. The team, called REVEALS (Radiation Effect on Volatiles and Exploration of Asteroids and Lunar Surfaces), will study radiation on other planets and build radiation-proof space suits. What can this technology do for us in space exploration? Georgia Public Broadcasting interviews Thomas Orlando, a professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, the director of the Georgia Tech Center for Space Technology and Research (CSTAR), and the leader of the REVEALS team. 

    Georgia Public Broadcasting, Apr 6, 2017

  • Electric Sand: How Titan's Dunes Got Their Weird Shapes

    A billion kilometers away from Earth's oldest and most majestic sand dunes, Saturn's moon Titan is also sporting some impressive features at its equatorial deserts, thanks to radar imaging from the Cassini orbiter. Yet Titan's dunes aren't just formed by winds; electrostatic forces are also at work, according to new research from School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Professor Josef Dufek, and graduate students Josh Mendez Harper and George McDonald.

    Scientific American , Apr 3, 2017

  • On Second Thought: Empathy 


    Empathy is a crucial human ability. It’s the basis of the golden rule: do unto others as you’d have them do unto you. New research from Georgia Tech finds that empathy can help prevent the spread of disease during an outbreak. This segment on Georgia Public Broadcasting's "On Second Thought" program featured Ceyhun Eksin, a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of School of Biological Sciences professor Joshua S. Weitz. Eksin and Weitz collaborated with a researcher from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology.

    Georgia Public Broadcasting, Apr 3, 2017

  • International search underway for Georgia Tech engineering dean

    Julia Kubanek, a professor in the School of Biological Sciences and the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, is chairing a 15-member advisory committee that has begun the search for a new dean for the College of Engineering at Georgia Tech. The current dean, Gary May, is leaving to become the seventh chancellor of the University of California, Davis. Kubanek is also the associate dean for research in the College of Sciences.

    Atlanta Business Chronicle, Mar 29, 2017

  • Douglas County to become Georgia’s first computer science school system

    Douglas County Schools will be the first district in Georgia to offer computer science classes to all grade levels, it announced Tuesday. Douglas will phase in the Computer Science for All initiative over the next three years. It will partner with Google, Code.org, Georgia Tech’s Center for Education Integrating Math, Science and Computing (CEISMC) and the Georgia Department of Education.

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Mar 29, 2017

  • Swirls are a step toward self-propelled fluid

    Imagine a liquid that could move on its own without human effort or the pull of gravity. You could put it in a container flat on a table, not touch it in any way, and it would still flow. As reported in Science, researchers have taken the first step in creating a self-propelling liquid. The finding offers the promise of developing an entirely new class of fluids that can flow without human or mechanical effort. School of Physics Associate Professor Alberto Fernandez-Nieves and postdoctoral fellow Ya-Wen Chang co-authored the study, which was led by collaborators at Brandeis University.

    Futurity , Mar 28, 2017

  • Sands in Saturn's Largest Moon Are Electrically Charged

    A new study from Georgia Institute of Technology revealed that the sands in the surface of Saturn's largest moon Titan could be electrically charged. The study, published in the journal Nature Geoscience, showed that the non-silicate granules of Titan become frictionally charged as they collide with each other in a process known as saltation. School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Professor Josef Dufek, and graduate students Josh Mendez Harper and George McDonald co-authored the study.

    Nature World News , Mar 28, 2017

  • 'Electric Sands' Cover Titan

    To build a sandcastle here on Earth, the sand needs to be wet so it can stick together. Not so on Saturn’s strange and largest moon Titan, according to a new Georgia Tech-led study published in Nature GeoscienceJosef Dufek, a professor in the School of Earth and Atmosphere Studies, co-authored the study with EAS graduate students Josh Mendez Harper and George McDonald. Harper is the study's lead author.

    Voice of America , Mar 28, 2017

  • Grains on Titan would cling to a spacecraft ‘like packing peanuts’

    Particles that cover the surface of Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, are electrically charged and can get clingy -- much like packing peanuts cling to things on Earth....“If you grabbed piles of grains and built a sand castle on Titan, it would perhaps stay together for weeks due to their electrostatic properties,” says Josef Dufek, a professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology, who co-led a study on the sands of Titan. Dufek is in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. EAS doctoral student Josef Mendez Harper is the study's lead author; EAS graduate student George McDonald is a co-author. 

    Futurity , Mar 27, 2017

  • Climate Change May Be Intensifying China's Smog Crisis

    Chinese leaders, grappling with some of the world's worst air pollution, have long assumed the answer to their woes was gradually reducing the level of smog-forming chemicals emitted from power plants, steel factories and cars. But new research suggests another factor may be hindering China's efforts to take control of its devastating smog crisis: climate change. One of those studies is by Yuhang Wang, a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Tech.

    The New York Times, Mar 24, 2017

  • Hand Sanitizer Won't Stop an Office Outbreak—If Your Coworker Doesn't Care

    According to a study published by Georgia Tech researchers in the journal Scientific Reports, healthy people who take measures to avoid getting sick cannot fully eradicate the spread of disease without an infected individual taking preemptive steps first. Instead, the sick individual in question needs to take steps to avoid infecting anyone else, and the main motivator for taking those steps seems to be empathy -- the ability to understand the feelings of others. Ceyhun Eksin and Joshua S. Weitz collaborated on the study with a researcher from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology.  Eksin is a postdoctorate fellow in Weitz's lab in the School of Biological Sciences. 

    Invisiverse , Mar 22, 2017

  • Mathematicians create warped worlds in virtual reality

    To explore the mathematical possibilities of alternative geometries, mathematicians imagine such ‘non-Euclidean’ spaces, where parallel lines can intersect or veer apart. Now, with the help of relatively affordable VR devices, researchers are making curved spaces — a counter-intuitive concept with implications for Einstein’s theory underlying gravity and also for seismology — more accessible. They may even uncover new mathematics in the process. “You can think about it, but you don’t get a very visceral sense of this until you actually experience it,” says Elisabetta Matsumoto, a physicist at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta.

    Nature, Mar 21, 2017

  • How Climate Change Covered China in Smog

    What made the winter smog in China so bad in 2013 and in the winters since? Two new studies...argue that climate change will make this kind of smog event much more common. And, remarkably, one of them - by Yuhang Wang and others at the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Tech - asserts that the Chinese smog of January 2013 was worsened by two weather phenomena thousands of miles away. 

    The Atlantic, Mar 21, 2017

  • NASA Selects New Research Teams to Further Solar System Research

    NASA has selected four new research teams to join the existing nine teams in SSERVI (Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute) to address scientific questions about the Moon, near-Earth asteroids, the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos, and their near space environments, in cooperation with international partners. One of the teams is from Georgia Institute of Technology, led by School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Professor Thomas Orlando. 

    Engadget, Mar 21, 2017

  • NASA signs up four research teams to study the Solar System

    While NASA already has plenty of scientists, it still regularly works with research teams from various universities and non-profit orgs. It even created the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) to oversee some of its collaborations. In fact, the agency has added four new teams looking to study the moon, near-Earth asteroids and Martian moons Phobos and Deimos to SSERVI's roster. One of the teams is from Georgia Institute of Technology, led by Thomas Orlando, a professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. .

    Engadget, Mar 19, 2017

  • Radiation from Nearby Galaxies Bulked Up Early Monster Black Holes

    Bright radiation emitted by neighboring galaxies likely fueled the rapid growth of supermassive black holes in the early universe, a new study shows. John Wise, an associate professor in the School of Physics, is a co-author of the study.

    Space.com, Mar 18, 2017

  • Study: Stopping global warming only way to save coral reefs

    Kim Cobb, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, comments on a new research study of Australia's Great Barrier Reef. The study indicates that rising ocean temperatures are doing more damage to coral reefs than previously thought. "A future that we thought was decades coming is basically here," Cobb says. 

    ABC News, Mar 16, 2017

  • Melting Arctic ice likely worsens winter haze in China: study

    Climate change in the polar regions may have worsened winter haze problems in China, according to a study....The study published in the U.S. journal Science Advances suggests that melting Arctic sea ice and increasing Eurasian snow, both caused by global climate change, have shifted China's winter monsoon, helping create stagnant atmospheric conditions that trap pollution over the country's major population and industrial centers. "Emissions in China have been decreasing over the last four years, but the severe winter haze is not getting better," said Yuhang Wang, a professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology, who led the study. Yuhang Wang is a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

    Xinhua, Mar 16, 2017

  • How melting Arctic sea ice is keeping smog over China

    “We will make our skies blue again,” vowed Chinese Premier Li Keqiang earlier this month, pledging aggressive new steps to combat China’s notorious smog....But a study adds a possible wrinkle to China’s fight for blue skies. Climate change – in particular, the melting of Arctic sea ice – makes the country's smog even more likely to stay where it is. “The ventilation is getting worse,” one of the study’s co-authors, Georgia Tech atmospheric scientist Yuhang Wang, told Science Magazine. Yuhang Wang is a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. The report he co-authored was first published in Science Advances. 

    Christian Science Monitor, Mar 16, 2017

  • O&P Research Supports Evidence-based Care

    Negotiating uneven ground can be challenging for people who use lower-limb prostheses to walk, so researchers spend time searching for solutions that will allow greater stability in these situations. Manufacturers of prosthetic feet have contributed to a solution by adding multiaxial features that better reproduce the behavior of human ankles, which can stiffen as the terrain warrants. However, School of Biological Sciences Senior Lecturer W. Lee Childers found that there was a lack of evidence evaluating the prosthetic ankle stiffness as it relates to the user’s dynamic balance and gait over uneven terrain. Thus, his continuing research focuses on defining the effect of multiaxial stiffness on gait stability among people with unilateral transtibial amputations....“The main focus of this work was to justify that it is a good thing for prosthetic feet to have multiaxial function,” Childers says, because if it can prevent falls among its users, its value is demonstrated to the payers.

    The O&P Edge, Mar 16, 2017

  • Large Sections of Australia’s Great Reef Are Now Dead, Scientists Find

    The Great Barrier Reef in Australia has long been one of the world’s most magnificent natural wonders, so enormous it can be seen from space, so beautiful it can move visitors to tears. But the reef, and the profusion of sea creatures living near it, are in profound trouble. Kim M. Cobb,  a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, comments on a recent study.

    The New York Times, Mar 15, 2017

  • Smoggy in Beijing? A lack of Arctic sea ice may be to blame

    In the winter of 2013, Beijing and other cities in the East China Plains became blanketed in thick, eye-stinging, gray smog....News articles at the time attributed the so-called “airpocalypse” to China’s heavy coal emissions. But that’s only part of the story, according to a new study published in Science Advances....“This is the first study that shows that climate changes in the high Arctic had a significant effect in winter haze in China,” says study co-author Yuhang Wang, a professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

    The Verge, Mar 15, 2017

  • Loss of Arctic sea ice is hitting Beijing hard with more intense air pollution

    ....The progressive loss of the Arctic's sea ice due to climate change is increasing the intensity of Beijing's winter air pollution, finds a study published in the journal Science Advances. Both the loss of ice in the Arctic and increased snowfall across Eurasia have affected China's winter monsoon season...and their combined effects are said to be leading to increasingly stagnant air in China...."That flattens the temperature and pressure gradients...decreasing wind speeds and creating an atmospheric circulation that makes the air in China more stagnant," said study author Yuhang Wang of Georgia Tech's School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences.

    International Business Times, Mar 15, 2017

  • ‘Airpocalypse’ smog events in China linked to melting ice cap, research reveals

    Climate change played a major role in the extreme air pollution events suffered recently by China and is likely to make such “airpocalypses” more common, new research has revealed....“The very rapid change in polar warming is really having a large impact on China,” said Prof. Yuhang Wang, at Georgia Tech in the U.S., who led the new research. “Emissions in China have been decreasing over the last four years, but the severe winter haze is not getting better.” Yuhang Wang is a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. The study he co-authored was first published in Science Advances. 

    The Guardian, Mar 15, 2017

  • Why is China’s smog so bad? Researchers point far away to a melting Arctic

    In China, the winter of 2013 was an “airpocalypse.” A thick soup of harmful smog cloaked its biggest cities, contributing to at least 90,000 deaths and sickening hundreds of thousands more. Things haven’t gotten much better since then, even though the country has enacted tough new emissions controls. A new study may explain why....“The ventilation is getting worse,” says study author Yuhang Wang, an atmospheric scientist at Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. “We think climate change, as it is driving rapid warming of the Arctic, is having a large effect on pollution in China.” Yuhang Wang is a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. The study he co-authored was first published in Science Advances. 

    Science , Mar 15, 2017

  • Changing weather patterns are trapping pollution over Chinese cities

    China has become a world leader in the fight against global warming, but its severe winter air pollution has worsened -- likely as a result of changing atmospheric circulation caused by climate change, according to a new study published in the journal Science Advances.
    While emissions are decreasing in China, the winter haze is not improving “because of a very rapid change in the high polar regions where sea ice is decreasing and snowfall is increasing,” said study author Yuhang Wang, a professor of earth and atmospheric sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

    Popular Science, Mar 15, 2017

  • China's 'airpocalypse' linked to Arctic sea ice loss

    The air pollution that lingered over eastern China for nearly a month in 2013 has been linked to the loss of Arctic sea ice the previous autumn. A study says the haze lasted much longer because the melting ice and increased snowfall altered wind circulation patterns...."Had the Chinese government not reduced emissions as much as they did in the last four years we would have seen the same or worse airpocalypse events," said Yuhang Wang from Georgia Tech University, one of the report's authors. Yuhang Wang is a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Institute of Technology. The report he co-authored was first published in Science Advances. 

    BBC, Mar 15, 2017

  • Dust From Brakes And Tires Can Impact Health, Ga. Tech Study Finds

    Georgia Tech researchers have found it's not just car emissions sending people to emergency rooms in Atlanta, but all that dust coming off brakepads and tires....Georgia Tech’s School of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences professor Rodney Weber said thanks to fewer diesel engines on the road and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations, air quality has drastically improved in Atlanta in the last 15 years. "But there's still enough sulfate to make it really, really acidic,” Weber said. “It has a pH in Atlanta of probably around 0 to 2, which is like car battery acid." The study was published in Environmental Science and Technology and included research from EAS graduate students Ting Fang, Hongyu Guo, Linghan Zeng and EAS professor Athanasio Nenes

    WABE 90.1, Mar 13, 2017

  • Scientists May Have Solved the Origin of Supermassive Black Holes

    Supermassive black holes sit at the center of nearly every massive galaxy situated in the universe. Scientists don’t know how supermassive black holes form, but a new paper in the journal Nature Astronomy, illustrates a theory crazy enough to perhaps work. The running hypothesis is that black holes are born out of the collapse of a star, which can eventually suck up enough mass that they grow into supermassive black holes (SBHs). That process is thought to take billions of years, but scientists have already catalogued some SBHs that date back to 13.8 billion years in age — also the age of the universe. This would mean that some SBHs, if not all, form much more quickly than scientists originally suspected...If a huge nearby galaxy could pump enough radiation into a smaller galaxy that already hosted a black hole, the radiation could split molecular hydrogen into atomic hydrogen, stopping the galaxy from forming new stars and ultimately forcing it to collapse under the gravitational pressure of the black hole. Thus, the black hole would suck up that mass and quickly become an SBH...“The nearby galaxy can’t be too close, or too far away, and like the Goldilocks principle, too hot or too cold,” said John Wise, co-author of the study and associate astrophysics professor at Georgia Tech. Wise is an associate professor in the School of Physics. 

    Inverse, Mar 13, 2017

  • A Wild New Hypothesis for How the First Monster Black Holes Formed

    It’s no secret that supermassive black holes are heartless beasts: These objects of immense gravity that let nothing, not even light escape, have fascinated astronomers since the early 20th century. While it’s believed that so-called supermassive black holes lurk at the center of most galaxies, including our own, there’s still much we don’t know about how they formed, or why, except to remind us of our own mortality. But new research from an international team of scientists might have some answers to at least one of the critical questions -- namely, how supermassive black holes, which range in size from millions to billions of solar masses, apparently formed very quickly in the early universe. Using computer simulations, the researchers found that these giants can grow incredibly fast if they can suck the life (read: radiation) out of a nearby galaxy, disabling their host galaxy’s ability to create stars...The researchers found that the neighboring galaxy supplying the radiation had to be a certain size and distance away from the black hole’s host galaxy -- though these cosmic energy sources could be smaller and closer galaxies than other studies estimated. “The nearby galaxy can’t be too close, or too far away, and like the Goldilocks principle, too hot or too cold,” study co-author John Wise, an associate astrophysics professor at Georgia Tech, said. Wise is an associate professor in the School of Physics. 

    Gizmodo, Mar 13, 2017

  • The mystery of the first monster black holes explained

    More than ten years ago, astronomers made a discovery that has puzzled them ever since – supermassive black holes appeared to have popped up soon after the start of the Universe. It is thought to take billions of years for supermassive black holes to form, but at least 20 of them were spotted at the dawn of the Universe, just 800 million years after the Big Bang. A team of researchers from Dublin City University, Columbia University, Georgia Tech, and the University of Helsinki, have now used computer simulations to attempt to solve the mystery. The results say a black hole can grow quickly if the galaxy it is in stops forming stars....To stop stars forming, there has to be a bright galaxy nearby, emitting radiation that can split molecular hydrogen into atomic hydrogen. This prevents stars in the galaxy from forming from the molecular hydrogen...."The nearby galaxy can't be too close, or too far away, and like the Goldilocks principle, too hot or too cold," said co-author John Wise, from Georgia Tech. The researchers published their findings in Nature AstronomyJohn Wise is an associate professor in the School of Physics.

    Wired, Mar 13, 2017

  • How droplets go from ‘donut’ to sphere

    New research clarifies how toroidal droplets—which initially take the shape of a donut—evolve into spherical droplets by collapsing into themselves or breaking up into smaller droplets. Work with droplets has implications for the life sciences, and could improve industrial processes....“Surface tension drives the evolution of the droplets,” says Alexandros Fragkopoulos, a PhD candidate at Georgia Institute of Technology. “Fluids tend to minimize their surface area for a given volume because that minimizes the energy required to have an interface between different fluids. Spherical shapes minimize that energy, and as a result, toroidal droplets want to evolve to become spherical. We’re studying how that transition occurs."...The impetus for the experimental work was inconsistencies between theoretical predictions and computer simulation of toroidal droplet transitions. What the researchers found tends to back up the simulation results. “However, the earlier theoretical work was essential in guiding the theory efforts and in illustrating what the problem was in order to correctly describe the experimental results,” says Alberto Fernandez-Nieves, in whose lab the research took place. Alexandros Fragkopoulos is a graduate teaching assistant in the School of Physics, where Alberto Fernandez-Nieves is an associate professor. 

    Futurity, Mar 13, 2017

  • Great Barrier Reef In Trouble: Here's How Scientists Try To Save It

    Beyond tourism concern, the trouble in Australia's Great Barrier Reef could spell trouble for mankind. It may seem far removed but the slow death the giant coral structure is experiencing could also foreshadow the doom that awaits the human society.... This is even more alarming as the Great Barrier Reef is reported to have suffered from massive coral bleaching — the second of such event in two years.... All is not lost, however. Scientists agree that the Great Barrier Reef is in trouble and may be dying but it is not dead yet. It is not yet time to write the obituary.... "This is a fatalistic, doomsday approach to climate change that isn't going to engage anyone and misinforms the public," coral reef expert Kim Cobb from Georgia Tech said. Cobb is convinced that a portion of the giant barrier reef and coral reefs around the world will stay beyond 2050. Kim Cobb is a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

    Tech Times, Mar 13, 2017

  • Saturn's Moon Titan May Offer a Glimpse of Life as We Don't Know It

    Next month, NASA's Cassini spacecraft will make its 126th and final pass around Saturn's large moon Titan, leaving scientists with a rich picture of a geologically active world with liquid hydrocarbon lakes, complex atmospheric chemistry, and likely even a salty ocean buried beneath its icy crust. But their biggest question will be left unanswered for now: Does Titan, which resembles a primordial Earth, have life?...Titan offers many examples of really interesting organic chemistry experiments with alternative structures, added Georgia Tech planetary scientist Britney Schmidt. "The Titan example is fantastic because you have a sedimentary process like a terrestrial planet, but it's ice involved," she said. "It's organic in nature, but it is not necessarily biogenic." Britney Schmidt is an assistant professor with the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

    Space.com, Mar 12, 2017

  • The Microbiome of the Clouds

    Bacteria in the soil can hitch a ride on raindrops and be deposited into the air once the drops pop, according to a recent study in Nature Communications. Under the right wind conditions, some of these bacteria could be lifted even higher into the sky. But what happens once microbes are in the atmosphere? Atmospheric chemist Athanasios Nenes, a professor with the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, is currently collecting samples of the airborne microbiome in the troposphere five to nine miles above the Eastern Mediterranean. So far he has found a mix of 17 different taxa of bacteria. Nenes, along with EAS professor Rodney Weber and other researchers, also helped develop a unique instrument to measure bioavailable phosphate ions in atmospheric particles. Bioavailable phosphate can act as a fertilizer for the oceans, with profound impacts for ocean life and the carbon cycle.

    NPR Science Friday, Mar 10, 2017

  • Saturn's Titan Moon May Offer a Glimpse of Life as We Don't Know It

    Next month, NASA's Cassini spacecraft will make its 126th and final pass around Saturn's large moon Titan, leaving scientists with a rich picture of a geologically active world with liquid hydrocarbon lakes, complex atmospheric chemistry, and likely even a salty ocean buried beneath its icy crust. But their biggest question will be left unanswered for now: Does Titan, which resembles a primordial Earth, have life?...Titan offers many examples of really interesting organic chemistry experiments with alternative structures, added Georgia Tech planetary scientist Britney Schmidt. "The Titan example is fantastic because you have a sedimentary process like a terrestrial planet, but it's ice involved," she said. "It's organic in nature, but it is not necessarily biogenic." Britney Schmidt is an assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

    Seeker, Mar 9, 2017

  • Powering mass spec ionization with friction improves sensitivity

    If you’ve ever rubbed a balloon against your head to make your hair stand on end, you’ve experienced triboelectricity. Researchers at Georgia Tech are now putting such electricity—which is really just an electric charge generated by friction—to good use: They’re using triboelectricity to drive the ionization of molecules in a mass spectrometer.
    Materials scientist Zhong Lin Wang, mass spectrometrist Facundo M. Fernández, and coworkers replace the high-voltage power supplies that usually drive ionization with devices called triboelectric nanogenerators, or TENGs. The researchers published their findings in Nature Nanotechnology. Wang and Fernandez are professors in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. 

    Chemical and Engineering News, Mar 1, 2017

  • Trailblazing Georgia Tech B.S. Applied Mathematics Graduate Michole Washington

    Michole Washington, a recent B.S. Applied Mathematics graduate of the Georgia Institute of Technology, speaks with WABE's Rose Scott about being the ninth African-American woman to receive a B.S. in applied mathematics from the Institute (starts at 24:36.) Washington, who spent her summers as a child in libraries working on math problems, is now the founder and CEO of Afrithmetic, which provides mathematics tutoring for minority students. 

    WABE 90.1, Closer Look with Rose Scott and Jim Burress, Feb 28, 2017

  • Early Bird Special: Spring Pops Up Super Early in Much of US

    Spring has sprung early -- potentially record early -- in much of the United States....The unseasonably warm weather has the natural world getting ahead of -- even defying -- the calendar, scientists said. Georgia Tech climate scientist Kim Cobb said what's happening is disconcerting, no matter how nice it is for people. "Sure we can't wait to shed our wool coats and hats each spring, but such warm temperatures are wreaking havoc, sight unseen on key crops," Cobb said in an email. "Here in Georgia peach buds have been robbed of necessary 'chill hours' this winter." Kim Cobb is a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

    The New York Times, Feb 28, 2017

  • Mass Spectrometry Gets a New Power Source and a New Life

    Mass spectrometry is a chemical analysis and detection tool that has been around for 130 years. In that time there have been so many tweaks and improvements that observers have become a bit blasé about the next big leap in its development. But the latest improvement out of the Georgia Institute of Technology may be the biggest yet for the venerable old analytical tool. In research described in Nature Nanotechnology, the Georgia Tech researchers have managed to make mass spectrometry more sensitive than ever before, more portable, cheaper, and even safer...“The sensitivity has been increased to being able to detect down to 100 molecules,” Zhong Lin Wang, adjunct professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, said in an email interview with IEEE Spectrum. “This is the highest ever"...Facundo Fernández, a professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, added: “Our discovery is basically a new and very controlled way of putting charge onto molecules."

    IEEE Spectrum, Feb 27, 2017

  • More Earth-Like Than Moon-Like

    Mars’ mantle may be more complicated than previously thought. In a new study published in the Nature-affiliated journal Scientific Reports, researchers at LSU document geochemical changes over time in the lava flows of Elysium, a major Martian volcanic province....They found that the unusual chemistry of lava flows around Elysium is consistent with primary magmatic processes....“Long-lived volcanic systems with changing magma compositions are common on Earth, but an emerging story on Mars,” said James Wray, study co-author and associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Tech...."At Elysium we are truly seeing the bulk chemistry change over time, using a technique that could potentially unlock the magmatic history of many more regions across Mars.”

    LSU News and Media Center, Feb 24, 2017

  • Is It Okay to Enjoy the Warm Winters of Climate Change?

    This is not how February is supposed to feel. From D.C. to Denver, from Charlotte to Chicago, towns and cities across the United States have posted strings of record-breaking summery days in what is normally the final month of winter....All in all, the United States has already set more than 2,800 new record high temperatures this month.... “Those of us who have office jobs and bike to work may be enjoying these temperatures, there are a large number of stakeholders in the agricultural community who see doom more clearly in them than we do,” says Kim Cobb, a biogeochemist at Georgia Tech University [sic]. “I know without a doubt that should such unseasonbly warm temperatures continue into the summer, we will see energy bills spike to astronomical levels, see older residents suffer, and see schoolchildren have to stay inside due to temperatures spiking past human thresholds,” she added. Kim Cobb is a professor in Georgia Institute of Technology School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. 

    The Atlantic, Feb 23, 2017

  • Europa Mission Heralds Sea Change in Search for Alien Life

    It’s not something NASA likes to advertise, but ever since its creation in 1958, the space agency has only conducted one direct, focused hunt for extraterrestrial life—and that was more than 40 years ago. It happened in 1976, when the twin Viking landers touched down at separate sites on Mars to look for any signs of life lurking on the planet’s desolate, freeze-dried surface. Now, after decades of wandering in Martian deserts, NASA’s astrobiologists are at last preparing to rekindle a direct search for a “second genesis” of life in our solar system—but not where one might think. This time, they will look well beyond Mars, the most Earthlike of our planetary neighbors, to the dark reaches of the outer solar system. A new study co-authored by Britney Schmidt, a planetary scientist in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is helping NASA target Jupiter's moon Europa and its icy seas. 

    Scientific American, Feb 17, 2017

  • How Brain-Machine Interfaces Engage Neural Plasticity

    Over the past year, scientists have made great strides in the development of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs), wired external devices that are controlled solely by brain activity [see Roadmapping the Adoption of Brain-Machine Interfaces”]. Last October, Nathan Copeland, a man who had been paralyzed from the chest down for more than 10 years, made headlines when he fist-bumped President Obama with a BMI-controlled robotic arm using only his thoughts. As BMI-related technologies and neuroprosthetics become more sophisticated, researchers are learning that these tools can make some fascinating changes to the brain, engaging its natural plasticity in sometimes unanticipated ways. Understanding those changes to underlying plasticity, some say, could offer clues to how to rewire and rehabilitate the damaged brain—perhaps even without the need of external hardware. Prosthetics, even without the addition of a BMI component, can alter the brain’s connections, says Lewis Wheaton, director of the Cognitive Motor Control Lab at the Georgia Institute of Technology says.

    The Dana Foundation News, Feb 15, 2017

  • Coral Reef Protection: Marine Sanctuaries Can Be Counterproductive If They Are Small In Size

    That corals around the world are dying under an onslaught of various human activities is nothing new, and a number of conservation efforts have been underway for decades now. But small marine protected areas (MPAs) that have been established to allow coral reefs and associated fish species to recover from the ravages of overfishing could actually be, unwittingly, making things worse, a study found. Using the example of an MPA in Fiji Islands, Mark Hay, one of the two authors of the study and a professor at Georgia Institute of technology, said in a statement Monday: “The marine protected areas that are enforced in the Fiji Islands are having a remarkable effect. The corals and fishes are recovering. But once these marine protected areas are successful, they attract the sea stars which can make the small marine protected areas victims of their own success.” 

    International Business Times, Feb 7, 2017

  • Of a Frog’s Slap Shot and Saliva

    You never know when a frog playing an electronic game will lead to an experiment on the physics of saliva....Alexis C. Noel, a Ph.D. student in mechanical engineering at Georgia Tech, and her supervisor, David L. Hu, were watching a viral YouTube video in which a frog is attacking the screen of a smartphone running an ant-smashing game. It appears to be winning. They started wondering how — in reality — frog tongues stick to insects so quickly when they shoot out to grab them, and decided it was a phenomenon worth studying. David Hu is an associate professor of mechanical engineering and of biology, as well as an adjunct associate professor of physics, at Georgia Tech. 

    The New York Times, Feb 6, 2017

  • Marc Merlin Makes Magic at the Atlanta Science Tavern

    Marc Merlin describes himself as a curator, but doesn’t run a museum or library—he hosts a gathering at a local pub. The organization, called the Atlanta Science Tavern (AST), serves up presentations and learning opportunities in a unique, open environment. Georgia Tech's College of Sciences contributes to many of these lectures and presentations, including by School of Mathematics Professor Matt Baker and School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Ph.D student Luju Ojha.

    SouthEast Makers, Feb 3, 2017

  • Scientist cracks mystery of the frog’s powerful tongue. It’s called spit.

    Georgia Tech researchers explain how frogs maintain their grip on their prey during the speedy attacks with their prehensile tongues. The study, published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, was conducted by mechanical engineering Ph.D. student Alexis Noel under the guidance of David Hu, a professor of mechanical engineering and of biology and an adjunct professor of physics.

    Washington Post, Feb 1, 2017

  • Earwax: Coming To a Home Air Filtration System Near You?

    It's not every day that a diving vacation paves the way for a possible technological innovation, much less one that involves earwax. Yet, that's precisely what happened for Alexis Noel. The mechanical engineering PhD candidate at the Georgia Institute of Technology described her scuba diving trip, her boyfriend’s subsequent water-clogged ear, and the culprit—earwax—that kept the water trapped behind his eardrum to her professor, David Hu. In no time, the two were engaged in detailed discussions about the sticky substance. Then it hit: What more can be learned from earwax? David Hu is an associate professor of mechanical engineering and of biological sciences and an adjunct associate professor of physics at Georgia Tech. 

    Smithsonian Magazine, Jan 25, 2017

  • Scientists react to Earth’s warmest year: ‘We are heading into a new unknown’

    For the third time in as many years, the planet’s temperature has soared to a record high.NOAA and NASA announced Wednesday that 2016 was the warmest year on record for Earth. Scientists, including School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Professor Kim Cobb, react to the news.

    Washington Post, Jan 18, 2017

  • Georgia Tech Lands Seven Yellow Jackets on 2017 Forbes 30 Under 30

    Students and alumni are noted for their strides in science, technology and entrepreneurship. Among them is School of Physics Ph.D. candidate Karan Jani.

    Georgia Tech News, Jan 13, 2017

  • The Awesome Science of Everyday Life: The Science Behind Neon Lights With The Neon Company And Georgia Tech

    Who better to help explain the calculated science behind the artistic craftsmanship of Atlanta's The Neon Company than School of Chemistry and Biochemistry's Eric Shen? His research on electrochromic materials - materials that change colors when zapped with an electric current - provides him with a unique perspective on how color and light can be manipulated. Shen provides insight into what’s going on at the atomic level with the fascinating light displays that The Neon Company produces for iconic Atlanta businesss and film/television productions, along with how it could connect to his own research.

    Atlanta Science Festival, Jan 11, 2017

  • MakeHer Mentor: Teaching local girls about coding

    MakeHer Mentor Georgia Tech brings together eighth-grade girls after school to learn all about coding. MakeHer Mentor is a collaborative initiative between HV Jenkins School of Engineering, STEM Academy at Bartlett, and Georgia Tech’s Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing (CEISMC)

    WTOC, Jan 11, 2017

  • How a moon slows the decay of Pluto's atmosphere

    Space Daily, Jan 10, 2017

  • Exploring The Roots Of Life

    School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Professor and Director of the Center for Chemical Evolution Nicholas Hud talks to Celeste Headlee, host of "On Second Thoughts," about the nature of origin-of-life research and its implications for current medical and space research.

    GPB News, Jan 4, 2017

  • How Did Life Start On Earth? Phosphorus May Have Triggered Development As It Migrated From Ocean Depths

    All it probably took was a little bit of fertilizer to get life started on Earth, scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Yale University found.

    IBTimes, Dec 21, 2016

  • Phosphorus: The key to life on Earth as we know it?

    Researchers talk about oxygen playing a significant role in kickstarting animal life on Earth, but a new study suggests a different element--phosphorus--might also be of crucial importance. 

    The Christian Science Monitor, Dec 21, 2016

  • Spiny lobster relies on deep-sea vent chemistry

    The Caribbean crustacean’s food chain contains bacteria that generate energy using sulfur oxidation, showing that chemosynthesis supports a multi-million-dollar fishing industry. School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Assistant Professor Jennifer Glass weighs in on a new study. 

    Chemical & Engineering News, Dec 8, 2016

  • An Open Letter from Scientists to President-Elect Trump on Climate Change

    College of Sciences Professors Annalisa Bracco, Kim Cobb, and Julia Kubanek and graduate student Shannon Owings, as well as College of Engineering graduate student Matthew Rager, join more than 800 Earth science and energy experts in urging President-elect Donald Trump to take six key steps to address climate change.

    Scientific American, Dec 6, 2016

  • Plumes Spotted on Europa Suggest Easy Access to Water

    Britney Schmidt, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, comments on water vapor erupting from Europa.

    Scientific American, Dec 1, 2016

  • In graveyard of dead coral, hope and life bloom

    Kim Cobb, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, discusses the revitalization of Pacific coral reefs.

    The Columbian, Nov 24, 2016

  • Can We Curb Selfish Behavior? One Georgia Tech Study Has An Answer

    Joshua Weitz, professor in the School of Biological Sciences, discusses his study on selfishness with Georgia Public Broadcasting presenters. 

    Georgia Public Broadcasting, Nov 21, 2016

  • Good News: Bleached Corals in the Pacific Have Started Recovering

    Kim Cobb, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, confirms the return of life to once-decimated Pacific coral reefs.

    Nature World News, Nov 21, 2016

  • In one bleached Pacific reef, some corals are 'back from the brink'

    Kim Cobb, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, comments on the observed rejuvenation of South Pacific coral reefs.

    The Christian Science Monitor, Nov 18, 2016

  • Could bird droppings help curb warming in the Arctic?

    Rodney Weber, professor in the School of earth and Atmospheric Sciences, weighs on the potential for bird droppings to influence temperatures in the Canadian Arctic.

    The Christian Science Monitor, Nov 15, 2016

  • These scientific breakthroughs could help address the world's water crisis

    Peter Webster, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, wins the Creativity Prize for this year's Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz Prize for Water. His innovative work is profiled here.

    Mashable, Nov 7, 2016

  • Global warming could be breaking up this 200 million year old relationship

    Kim Cobb, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, discusses the effects of climate change on the 200 million year-old symbiotic relationship between corals and algae.

    The Washington Post, Nov 2, 2016

  • One in seven of world’s children breathe toxic air, UNICEF reports

    Rodney Weber, professor of atmospheric chemistry in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, comments on the quality of air some children breathe.

    PBS Newshour, Oct 31, 2016

  • The Climate Questions the Next President Should Answer

    Kim Cobb, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, weighs in on important climate questions for the next president to consider.

    Climate Central, Oct 20, 2016

  • What To Do with a College of Sciences Degree

    To celebrate Georgia Tech’s 2016 Homecoming, we asked College of Sciences alumni to reflect on their Georgia Tech education. In the following profiles, alumni share what attracted them to Georgia Tech, the most important things they learned while pursuing their degrees in the College of Sciences, how their experiences at Tech influenced their career paths, and their vivid memories of their time at Tech. Our alumni also offer advice to current and prospective students.

    CoS Site Feature, Oct 20, 2016

  • It's electric! Georgia Tech produces electricity-generating textile

    Zhong Lin Wang, adjunct professor of chemistry and biochemistry, has created electricity-generating textiles at his lab.

    NBC 11Alive News, Oct 17, 2016

  • The Great Barrier Reef is under severe stress – but not dead yet

    Kim Cobb, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is featured in The Guardian discussing coral bleaching at the Great Barrier Reef.

    The Guardian, Oct 14, 2016

  • No, the Great Barrier Reef in Australia is NOT dead. But it is in trouble.

    Kim Cobb, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, discusses the health of the Great Barrier Reef with the Los Angeles Times.

    Los Angeles Times, Oct 14, 2016

  • Local scientists help NASA explore Europa, keeping Georgia front-runner for space exploration

    Planetary Scientists Carol Paty and Britney Schmidt, in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, discuss NASA's recent findings on Europa, one of Jupiter's moons. Their involvement in future NASA Europa missions keeps Georgia at the forefront of space exploration. http://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/atlanta/local-scientists-help-nasa-explore-europa-keeping-ga-a-front-runner-for-space-exploration/456882402

    WSB-TV Atlanta, Oct 13, 2016

  • The secret ingredient to early life’s primordial soup: Thickener

    The term "primordial soup" was coined nearly 100 years ago to describe the mysterious chemical broth that was home to Earth's very first self-replicating organisms. Ever since, scientists have been trying to cook that soup up in a lab, searching for the exact combination of compounds that gave rise to life as we know it some 4 billion years ago.

    The Washington Post, Oct 10, 2016

  • Abiogenesis: Life May Have Evolved From Non-Living Matter With Relative Ease

    Scientists may have discovered how precursors to the present-day genetic code first duplicated themselves before the existence of enzymes that are indispensable to that process today. The "easy" solution could have actually happened in a messy puddle billions of years ago.

    Futurism.com, Oct 10, 2016

  • Astronomers Spy Shadowy Plumes around Europa

    Europa expert Britney Schmidt, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, discusses the implications of recent evidence of water found on Europa.

    Scientific American, Sep 30, 2016

  • If There’s Life on Europa, Robots Like These Will Find It

    Astrobiologist Britney Schmidt, assistant professor in the School of Atmospheric Sciences, is the principal investigator of NASA's SIMPLE project. The project seeks to test a variety of robot platforms to find those most suitable for exploring Europa's oceans in the future. 

    Singularity Hub, Sep 29, 2016

  • Geysers of water vapor shooting from Europa could offer taste of ocean within

    Britney Schmidt, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, lends her expertise on Europa to comment on recent evidence of water found there.

    The Los Angeles Times, Sep 27, 2016

  • New evidence of geysers erupting from Europa’s icy ocean

    Europa expert Britney Schmidt, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, helps explain the significance of NASA's recent findings from their special Europa observation mission. 

    The Washington Post, Sep 27, 2016

  • Biology Book Awards Shortlists Revealed

    Joshua S. Weitz, professor in the School of Biological Sciences, has written a postgraduate textbook which has been selected for the shortlist of the Royal Society of Biology's annual book awards.

    Royal Society of Biology, Sep 14, 2016

  • These Georgia Tech physicists helped prove Einstein right

    Atlanta Magazine talks to School of Physics Professor and Director of the Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Deirdre Shoemaker and School of Physics Associate Professor Laura Cadonati, who were part of the international team that confirmed in February 2016 the existence of gravitational waves. These elusive cosmic phenomena were first predicted a century ago by Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity.

    Atlanta Magazine, Sep 1, 2016

  • Study: Trees may worsen Southeastern pollution

    Ronald Reagan once sloughed off the need for tougher clean-air rules, blaming vegetation for pollution. That simplistic notion was rebuffed by scientists who noted that trees help make overall air quality better by taking up pollution and they also help to cool off urban areas, which also can translate into less pollution. So the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommends trees for cities dealing with the kind of pollution that's challenged Louisville for decades, including this summer.

    Louisville Courier-Journal, Aug 24, 2016

  • C&EN's Talented 12: Lauren Austin

    “The Talented 12” is an annual feature of C&EN, ACS’ weekly newsmagazine, and profiles a dozen of the brightest young researchers using chemistry to solve global problems. The accomplishments of this impressive group include: creating more efficient solar cells, untangling the mysteries of aging, probing foods for contaminants, and developing drugs to treat Alzheimer’s and other diseases.

    C&EN, Aug 22, 2016

  • Study: Global warming means smoggier autumns in US Southeast

    The drier, warmer autumn weather that’s becoming more common due to climate change may extend summer smog well into the fall in the Southeastern U.S. in the years ahead, according to a study published on Monday.

    Washington Post, Aug 22, 2016

  • Marine Heatwaves Are Spawning Unprecedented Climate Chaos

    Wired, Aug 16, 2016

  • Marine Heatwaves Are Spawning Unprecedented Climate Chaos

    Wired, Aug 16, 2016

  • NASA: Last Month was Earth's Hottest in Recorded History

    Georgia Tech School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Professor Kim Cobb comments on rising global temperatures.

    The New York Times, Aug 15, 2016

  • 'Bee-Search' At Georgia Tech Gives Bees A New Urban Home

    Bees play an invaluable role in our ecosystem, but they are slowly dying out as a species. In order to further integrate bees into a city environment, the Urban Honey Bee Project at Georgia Tech hopes to create new homes for these vital insects while educating students on ecological responsibility. 

    Georgia Public Broadcasting, Aug 9, 2016

  • Local Efforts to Save Coral Reefs May Be Futile

    Climate Central, Jul 21, 2016

  • Did early land animals get a leg up by using their tails?

    The Christian Science Monitor, Jul 8, 2016

  • How tails may have helped ancient animals make the transition from water to land

    Los Angeles Times, Jul 8, 2016

  • Hightailing it out of the water, mudskipper style

    Science News, Jul 7, 2016

  • Scientists Use Robots to Study the Evolution of Ancient Aquatic Animals

    The Wall Street Journal, Jul 7, 2016

  • Running is Always Blind

    Nautilus, Jul 7, 2016

  • Climate Corridors Could Be Critical for the Survival of Plants and Animals

    Pacific Standard, Jun 13, 2016

  • A Simple Idea Could Help Wildlife Survive Climate Change

    Climate Central, Jun 13, 2016

  • Habitat Corridors Could Help Animals Adapt To Climate Change

    90.1 WABE, Atlanta's NPR Station, Jun 13, 2016

  • Computer simulations shed light on Milky Way’s missing red giants

    Astronomy Now, Jun 8, 2016

  • New models help explain why Milky Way has so few red giant

    United Press International, Jun 7, 2016

  • Simple Set Game Proof Stuns Mathematicians

    A new series of papers has settled a long-standing question related to the popular game in which players seek patterned sets of three cards.

    Quanta Magazine, May 31, 2016

  • Maths Mystery Solved After 40 years

    Cosmos Magazine, May 30, 2016

  • Air pollution doesn’t just make breathing harder for humans. In the Pacific, fish are choking, too.

    The Washington Post, May 16, 2016

  • Air pollution starving the oceans of oxygen: Dust released by human activity in East Asia is stripping oxygen from the Pacific.

     

    dailymail.com, May 16, 2016

  • Molecular ‘Midwives’ Helped Give Birth to RNA

    Astrobiology Magazine, May 16, 2016

  • Did alien life flourish in Ancient Martian Marshlands? Crater on Mars was much wetter and warmer 3.8 billion years ago.

    the Daily mail, May 2, 2016

  • Ocean's Oxygen Starts Running Low

    Scientific American, May 2, 2016

  • Why dead coral reefs could mark the beginning of ‘dangerous’ climate change

    The island of Kiritimati is one of the world’s most remote places — one of several dozen atolls making up the tiny island nation of Kiribati, a speck in the Pacific Ocean more than a thousand miles south of Hawaii. But, isolated as it is, news of its devastated coral is turning heads around the world. A recent expedition has revealed that the reefs around Kiritimati have suffered a catastrophic mass die-off — an event that epitomizes what may be an ugly truth about the ability of coral reefs around the world to adapt to the growing threat of climate change.

    Washington Post, Apr 12, 2016

  • The Largest Coral Atoll In The World Lost 80 Percent Of Its Coral To Bleaching

    Over the past two weeks, a team of researchers led by Julia Baum, a biologist at the University of Victoria and Kim Cobb, a climate scientist at Georgia Tech, has been stationed at Kiritimati, and via hundreds of dives they have taken comprehensive measurements of the reef’s health, or lack thereof in this case.

    Think Progress, Apr 12, 2016

  • Climate-Related Death of Coral Around World Alarms Scientists

    Kim Cobb, of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, talks with The New York Times.

    New York Times, Apr 10, 2016

  • Amanda Stockton: The Girl with the Big Nose

    Dr. Amanda Stockton is an assistant professor in the Chemistry and Biochemistry department at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her work walks the line between engineering and science to develop instrumentation capable of looking for organic molecules elsewhere in the solar system. These molecules could be the feedstock for an emergence of life or the remnants of past life now extinct on places like Europa, Enceladus, and Mars. 

    Story Collider, Apr 2, 2016

  • Beyond Record Hot, February Was 'Astronomical' and 'Strange'

    Georgia Tech climate scientist Kim Cobb said she normally doesn't concern herself much with the new high temperature records that are broken regularly.

    New York Times, Mar 17, 2016

  • Meet Mostafa A. El-Sayed, 2016 Priestley Medalist

    Professor Mostafa El-Sayed of the Georgia Tech School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, the 2016 Priestley Medalist, is featured in the cover story Chemical & Engineering News:

    Chemical & Engineering News, Mar 14, 2016

  • Early exposure to signing helps deaf kids on mental task

    Professor Jenny Singleton of the Georgia Tech School of Psychology explains how early exposure to sign language in deaf children can have lifelong benefits.

    Science News, Feb 13, 2016

  • Shaking a Sleeping Bog Monster

    In a northern Minnesota peat bog, Georgia Tech researchers are studying how microbes metabolize organic carbon.

    Research Horizons,

  • Next Generation Genius

    Georgia Tech cultivates science and technology education for K-12 students and teachers.

    Research Horizons,